Environment

Siberian Tiger numbers improved again last year

Siberian Tiger

Siberian Tiger numbers were in a critical state.

The world reportedly lost approximately 97% of its wild tiger population over the course of the last century.

While it’s been a hard fight, with a long way to go, there have been significant increases in some areas.

It was reported by The Guardian yesterday that an anti-poaching drive has helped greatly. Led by Pavel Fomenko, the head of rare species conservation for WWF Russia, the initiative has involved close monitoring and protective measures.

Pavel Fomenko carries a rifle, believed to have been abandoned by a poacher, through the forest wilderness of Primorski province. Photograph: Antonio Olmos for the World Wildlife Fund

Pavel Fomenko carries a rifle, believed to have been abandoned by a poacher, through the forest wilderness of Primorski province. Photograph: Antonio Olmos for the World Wildlife Fund

WWF plan to launch a new campaign which hopes to raise wild tiger numbers in excess of 6,000. The plan is to achieve this goal by 2022; the next Chinese Year of the Tiger.

“The world lost 97% of its tiger population in a little over a century, but last year, WWF reported that global numbers in the wild had risen from 3,200 in 2010 to about 3,900 in 2016, thanks to the introduction of anti-poaching patrols, habitat protection and other measures.

“The increase in tiger numbers is encouraging but the species’ future in its natural environment still hangs in the balance and numbers remain perilously low,” said Rebecca May, WWF’s tiger specialist. “There now needs to be an enormous push forward to build on this progress. We need commitment and urgent action from all governments of ‘tiger-range’ countries [where tigers still roam free], as well as the passion and unwavering support of the public.”

There are currently almost 4,000 tigers left in the wild, but protective measures are essential to ensure their survival.

The WWF will be asking people to become ‘tiger protectors’ by making a small monthly donation. To find out more about tiger conservation and the programme, visit the official WWF website.

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