Wolf pack in Denmark for first time in 200 years

A wolf hadn’t been spotted in Denmark for centuries, let alone a pack.

Then, as if out of nowhere, five years ago one was spotted outside Jutland (which separates the North and Baltic seas, and borders Germany).

Wolf Denmark

The female wolf was recently photographed by the Naturhistorisk Museum Aarhus and further DNA tests have been made, which confirm that she has come to mate. She has since been spotted with a male companion.

Of course, nothing is certain, but we expect that they will have cubs this year or the next,” Peter Sunde, a senior researchers at the Department of Bioscience at Aarhus University told DR Nyheder. (sc. The Copenhagen Post)

It is believed that the female has travelled over 500 km to find a mate. Experts believe that more wolves will likely make the move from Germany to Denmark, following in the wake of this pioneering female.

These two wolves will stay here the rest of their lives,” added Sunde. “Once they get cubs, they won’t move. Only if the female dies will the male start off somewhere else again.”

Experts also estimate that there are now approximately 40 wolves in Denmark, but they are keeping their whereabouts under wraps, so as not to attract attention which may scare off / harm the animals.

There are now an estimated 12,000 wolves in Europe, and their habitat is expanding. Last year, reports of a wolf in Belgium emerged; the first sighting of its kind for 118 years. The population exploded in France after a mating pair entered the country some years ago, and the animals have been spotted in several suburban areas.

Whilst there have been some protests and voices of concern from farmers and locals, the overwhelming feeling regarding the wolf pack has been a positive one. The below video showcases how a wolf reintroduction programme at Yellowstone National Park in the US has beneficially effected the ecosystem.

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