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Bataclan Cafe opens to the public once again

The Bataclan Cafe and venue were the target of one of the most shocking terrorist attacks of this decade. 

Patrons and concert goers were targeted by a squad of heavily-armed, militant terrorists, who killed 89 people during a performance by California’s Eagles of Death Metal on November 13, 2015.

With resilience, determination and a deluge of public support, the Bataclan venue reopened one year after the attacks, featuring a performance by Sting.

This week, new Grand Café Bataclan manager Michel Maallem spoke with Munchies (VICE‘s food network) about the reopening, and why it means so much to, not only himself, but the entire city of Paris.

Hiring a new chef to revolutionise the cuisine, brightening up the decor and creating a positive and comfortable atmosphere were all top of Maallem’s priorities.

They asked me if I was interested in running the Bataclan… and I thought about it a lot. I had a lot of apprehension,” he told Munchies. “I asked the people around me what they thought—my wife, my friends, my family. And they said, ‘Go for it. There’s no reason for you not to. Life goes on.’”

Michel Maallem. Photo by Emily Monaco via Munchies

It’s an adventure I accepted gladly,” he adds. “It’s an honor to be part of this sort of project, to bring a place that’s been part of Paris’ history back to life.”

Now the the Bataclan has been opened in its full capacity once more, it is hoped that things can move forward in a progressive and positive manner. Those who were lost on that November night will be forever immortalised by means of a series of memorials which can be located in and around the venue.

Colin J McCracken
Colin J McCracken

Director and Executive Editor

Colin J McCracken is an Irish editor and writer of both fiction and journalism. Coming from a background in education and film, his passions are split between the environmental and the entertaining. Constantly striving for a more sustainable existence and trying to balance it while simultaneously buying too many books.